• Course Numbers

    42220011 Geography A

    42220012 Geography B

    42220111 Modern World History A

    42220112 Modern World History B

    42230011 U.S. History Reconstruction to Present A

    42230012 U.S. History Reconstruction to Present B

    42240311 American Government (Not for Kentucky Students)

    42240511 Economics

    42240811 The Holocaust

    42212011 Civics A

    42212012 Civics B

    42241411 Civil Rights


    Course numbers ending in 1 are first semester courses.

    Course numbers ending in 2 are second semester courses.


  • Geography A (42220011)
    Geography A introduces the student to physical and human geography and the skills and methods of the geographer. Students receive a systematic study of patterns, geographic skills, concepts, and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. Regions of study include North, Central, and South America as well as the Caribbean.
  • Geography B (42220012)

    Geography B studies the Eastern Hemisphere and continues to introduce students to physical and human geography and the skills and methods of the geographer. Specific area studies introduce students to different geo-cultural areas and provide case-study opportunities for students to apply geography skills and concepts." 

  • Modern World History A (42220111)
    Modern World History A is an in-depth study of our global community's past, emphasizing the people and events that changed past societies, and how these changes affect our modern society. The course is separated into lessons comprising the following topic areas: Early civilizations such as Ancient Greece and Rome, the rise of Christianity and civilizations of the Americas, societies of the Middle Ages such as the Byzantine Empire, Russia and Eastern Europe, the Renaissance and Reformation, the start of the Global Age in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas, the Age of Absolutism, the regional civilizations of Islam, Africa, and the spread of civilization in East and Southeast Asia. Other topic areas include the French Revolution and Napoleon, the beginning of the Industrial Revolution and the Revolutions of Europe and Latin America, Nationalism in Europe, the growth of Western Democracies, and New Imperialism.
  • Modern World History B (42220112)
    Modern World History B is an in-depth study of our global community’s past, emphasizing the people and events that changed past societies, and how these changes affect our modern society. The course is separated into lessons comprising the following topic areas: World War I and the Russian Revolution, the rise of totalitarianism, World War II and its aftermath, the world since 1945 including the Cold War, the emergence of new nations, regional conflicts, the developing world and the world today.
  • U.S. History Reconstruction Part A (42230011)

    United States History Part A - The United States history courses explore events, movements and ideas from 1877 to the present. Each concept standard is outlined with a specific time period to limit the scope and sequence of the topics covered through that standard. Beginning with analyzing the causes and consequences of the Industrialization of America, students explore reasons for and responses to the move from rural to urban spaces and to the open West. As students study the United States’ transition to a manufacturing economy and the movement of people, they are exposed to the conflicts and compromises within a diverse social and ethnic population that begin in 1890, through its role as a nation on the global stage in World War I. Beginning with the Great Depression of 1929, students further analyze the role of economic and political influences on what it means 140 to be an American domestically and in World War II.


  • U.S. History Reconstruction Part B (42230012)

    United States History Part B - The United States history courses explore events, movements and ideas from 1877 to the present. Each concept standard is outlined with a specific time period to limit the scope and sequence of the topics covered through that standard.Further conflicting ideologies, starting in 1945, challenge students to investigate competing viewpoints as demographics shift in America. As students continue their analysis of the collapse of the Cold War Order and Modern Challenges, students are encouraged to focus on the roles played by the United States in the modern world and their own place as a citizen within that context. By developing inquiry skills in history, students apply their conceptual knowledge through questioning, investigating, using evidence and communicating conclusions so they are equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to be engaged citizens. 

  • American Government (Not for Kentucky Students) (42240311)
    This course examines the origins of the government of the United States and how it has developed over the past 230 years. The principles of democracy in our republican form of government are examined from the point of view of an active participating citizen of the nation. What the rights and responsibilities of a citizen such as yourself are will be valuable information not only for you but also for the future of the country. Radio and television newsman Edward R. Murrow said, "A nation of sheep begets a nation of wolves." People who allow themselves to be ignorant of their government will not enjoy their freedom long. French political theorist Joseph Marie de Maistre said, "Every nation has the government it deserves." People who do not vote or do not understand for what they are voting get what they ask for. Democracy is a delicate institution, and it is dependent upon an educated population to keep it going. This course is one small step in your education to be an informed, participating citizen.
  • Economics (42240511)
    In this economics course, high school students study how people, businesses, and governments choose to use resources. The six social studies standards of essential content knowledge and the four process skills for instructional purposes are integrated.
  • The Holocaust (42240811)
    The Holocaust is a study of individuality and social responsibility. The course studies the Holocaust as a particular event in history to investigate the norms of society as well as stereotypes and prejudices. The course allows students to confront complex issues, such as genocide and racism, encouraging them to look at themselves and their own prejudices, biases, and intolerances. Through this process, students will develop the ability to think critically and make informed and rational decisions. Using inquiry and individual research, students investigate individual and collective actions and reactions through a detailed and substantive study. The course looks at the German culture of the early twentieth century to see how social, political, and economic conditions, as well as world events, led to an environment in which the Holocaust could take place.
  • Civics A (42212011)

    Civics A is the study of the American political process including the foundations of American government. Topic areas included within this is an examination of what public policy is and who participates in the making of policy. It therefore involves a study of the Constitution, including grants of power and limitations on those powers within a federal system of government. Students will also examine the meaning of civil rights and civil liberties in relation to the policy-making process. There is also an examination and analysis of the roles of the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court within the constitutional framework of a federal system of government and the concept of separation of powers and checks and balances.

  • Civics B (42212012)

    Civics B is the study of the American political process including the politics surrounding American government. It includes the relationship between our national government and the governments of the 50 states. Topic areas include: political parties, elections, interest groups, public opinion, the media and public policy. There are also units on the structure of state and local governments as well as other political and economic systems.

  • Civil Rights (42241411)

    Civil Rights in America will focus on the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950’s and 1960’s. This course will examine the origins of the movement, the grass roots organization that leads to the Supreme Court, as well as figures and groups that promoted equality for all people. While the focus of the course is on African Americans, the fight of other groups such as Women, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, the Disabled, and LBGTQ will be included. The events of the Civil Rights Movement had an enormous impact on American society, so we will also look at what has and has not changed, and how the movement is connected to the Black Lives Matter movement of America today.