English Courses
  • Course Numbers

    42310111* Freshman English A                 

    42310112** Freshman English B               

    42320111 Sophomore English A                

    42320112 Sophomore English B

    42330111 Junior English A

    42330112 Junior English B

    42340111 Senior English A           

    42340112 Senior English B

    42360311 Horror Literature                 

    42360211 Science Fiction Literature

     

    *Course numbers ending in 1 are first semester courses.

    **Course numbers ending in 2 are second semester courses.

  • English 1A (42310111)
    Students will read John Steinbeck The Pearl and Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet as well as a short story, a nonfiction text, and several informational selections. The students also will complete a speaking and listening unit and a grammar unit in addition to quizzes and response questions that test knowledge of the texts. Students will write a narrative to develop real experiences using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured sequences. In addition, students will construct lengthier responses to provided passages. These will demonstrate their understanding of literary devices and their relationship to the writer’s central idea.
  • English 1B (42310112)
    This course addresses the essential question "How does conflict lead to change?" All texts in this course will relate to this question. Students will read selections from the well-known epic poem The Odyssey and consider Odysseus' conflicts and choices in relationship to their own. They will also read Warriors Don't Cry as well as two short stories, all involving very different kinds of conflicts, both real and fictional. In a speech unit, they'll explore two important speeches which are included in the Warriors memoir, analyzing them for both men's purpose in response to the great integration conflict in the late 1950s. Finally, students will do some timely reading, thinking, and research about "Fake News" and how we can determine truth in these times of great conflict.
  • English 2 A (42320111)

    This Common Core-aligned course addresses two different essential questions: “What makes us the same and different?” and “What does it take to survive?” All reading and writing is related to these two questions. Students will read the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, considering the deep racial divide which existed in the 1930s. They will read the multi-genre text Beaver Dam Rocking Chair Marathon as well as an essay and Travel Channel segment which all highlight different ways of thinking and viewing the world. Students will also read poetry and essays about universals, the values people from around the world have in common. In the survival unit, students will explore poems, short stories, speeches, and a monologue from The Miracle Worker which focus on issues of survival in the midst of tremendous odds. In response to these texts, students will write personal responses and brief analyses as well as complete a research project in response to a self-selected question. The research focus in this course is finding and evaluating credible sources as well as outlining and beginning citation.

  • English 2 B (42320112)

    This Common Core-aligned course addresses two different essential questions: “How does history shape who I am?” and “How have others made a lasting impression?” All reading and writing is related to these two questions. Students will read the memoir Having Our Say, which traces the effects of a century of American history on two one hundred year-old sisters. Students will also explore the impact of cultural, social, and political events on the lives and literature of Native Americans (“Trail of Tears”), women (“Women”), and African Americans (“Letter From Birmingham Jail,” “Passing”). Students will examine the lives of the great (Ozymandias) and not-so-great (Julius Caesar) – both in fiction and non-fiction – to determine why some people have such strong impressions on others. Students will write reading responses, brief analyses, and an argumentative essay. The research focus for this course is using evidence from sources within an essay.

  • English 3 A (42330111)

    The essential question for this course is “What was the promise of America?” All reading and writing is related to this question. Texts span pre-American years (1700s and before) through the 1940s. Students will read texts related to the earliest settlers including the voices of colonial slaves and women which were generally excluded from national conversations. They will also explore foundational American texts – the Bill of Rights and Preamble to the US Constitution as well as the pamphlet “Common Sense” – to understand the freedoms early Americans pursued. They will analyze a recent Supreme Court case in relation to these Constitutional rights. Students will also study universal “American” ideas in classical American literature, including poems (“The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere”), essays (‘Common Sense”) and novels (Tom Sawyer and The Grapes of Wrath). In response to this reading, students will write journal entries as well as a personal essay focusing on a chosen American ideal.

  • English 3 B (42330112)
    The essential question for this course is “What is the individual’s role in American society?” All reading and writing is related to this question. Students will explore texts from various time periods, in different genres, with authors from all walks of life. Most texts are by Americans, but some—such as Mohandas Gandhi’s “On Nonviolent Resistance”—are texts that have informed not only American writers but others worldwide. Students will consider some very early Americans and their complicated relationship to their society (as well as a similar one hundreds of years later) as they read The Crucible. They will explore the ideas of individuals who willingly stayed apart from society—Thoreau and Dickinson—and those who wholly embraced it, like Whitman. They will also read and study those whom society embraced (the rich and famous in The Great Gatsby) and those whom society has disenfranchised (The Freedom Riders, Gandhi). Finally, students will move to the twenty-first century as they choose to study either the modern individual’s complicated relationship to nature or to the digital world. Then the course will culminate with students writing about their own societies, as they try to solve community problems. Other writing for the course will be primarily argumentative, using the texts they’ve read to inform their own arguments.
  • English 4 A (42340111)
    The essential question for this course is “What is worth the effort?” All reading and writing is related to this question. Students will read short stories (“The Bet” and “Man From the South”), poetry (“The Road Not Taken,” “Risk-Taking is Free”), and drama (selections from The Canterbury Tales and Macbeth). Within these units, students will not only consider the essential question but also various themes and literary devices that are present in the works. Additionally, students will complete a grammar unit and a career writing unit, which will allow them to consider their interests as well as their future goals and careers which might align with the goals. The students will write both a résumé and cover letter. Their final exam in this course will be a culmination of their 12 years of reading and writing as they reflect on themes in the texts they’ve read.
  • English 4 B (42340112)
    In Unit 1, students will read Dickens’A Christmas Carol and explore the following themes: How do we define who we are? How do our choices affect others? What influences our most important life choices? Unit 2 focuses on grammar. In Unit 3, students will read Winston Churchill’s Speech on the Battle of Britain and explore the following theme: How do our words persuade others? In Unit 4, students will read The Last Lecture and explore the following themes: How do we define who we are? How do our choices affect ourselves and others? What do we leave for those who follow? In Unit 5, students will read “A White Heron” and study the rise of naturalism. The themes for this unit are: How do our choices affect others? What influences our most important life choices? In Unit 6, students will complete a career research project which explores the following themes: How do we define who we are? How do our choices affect ourselves and other? What do we leave for those who follow?
  • Horror Literature (42360311)
    This course is designed to allow the student to explore any of a broad range of topics from the language arts area. The course extends the student's abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, observing, and thinking. The goal of this elective course is to explore the importance and history of horror in literature.
  • Science Fiction Literature (42360311)
    Science Fiction Literature on science fiction and fantasy. Students will study the various subgenres, as well as biographies, of a few of the more important authors. This course is designed to allow the student to explore any of a broad range of topics from the language arts area. The course extends the student's abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, observing, and thinking.

    Students will select three novels and three short stories to read, write a short story of their own, take several practice quizzes, complete one test online, and take one final. In addition, students will study the impact that science fiction and fantasy literature have had on other media, such as movies and television. Students will demonstrate mastery of the novels and short stories with analysis of the plot, theme, symbolism, setting, and characterization of each.